Marquette University Dorothy Day Collection

http://marquette.edu

Special Collections
and Archives

DOROTHY DAY – CATHOLIC WORKER COLLECTION

AUDIO RECORDINGS OF INTERVIEWS AND TALKS, 1958-


DD-CW
Series W-9.1

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Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1 C-23 Amore Quotidiano, RAI (Radiotelevisione Italiana), December 1980-January 1981. Radioplay by Anna Maria Romagnoli on the life of Dorothy Day. 8 cassettes.
W-9.1 C-36 “Anarchism,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 5 December 1986. Roundtable discussion with Robert Peters, et al. Cassette.
W-9.1 C-35 “Anarchism, Voting and Elections,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 4 November 1988. Roundtable discussion with Meg Brodhead, Tim Lambert, and Katharine Temple. Cassette.
W-9.1 C-32 Anderson, Florence, “The Bible and the Brazilian Reality,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 18 January 1985. Cassette
W-9.1 C-32 Anderson, Florence, with Domingos Barbe and Gilberto Gorgulho, O.P., discussing the Catholic Church in Latin America with members of the New York Catholic Worker community, New York City, 20 February 1979. Cassette
W-9.1 C-32 Anderson, Florence, and Gilberto Gorgulho, O.P., discussing Liberation Theology with members of the New York Catholic Worker community, New York City, 26 July 1986. Cassette.
W-9.1 Box 5 Angus, Charlie, and Brit Griffin, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 13 July 1988. 2 cassettes. Transcribed
W-9.1 C-47 Anzus Plowshares program, Maryhouse, New York City, 16 March 1991. Speakers include Jackie Allen, Daniel Berrigan, Moana Cole, Sue Frankel, Sr. Anne Montgomery, Ciaron O’Reilly, and Bill Streit. Cassette.
W-9.1 C-24 Arns, Cardinal Dom Paulo, talk at Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 22 May 1981. Cassette.
W-9.1 Box 5 Arett, Carole, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 14 November 1987. Transcribed.
W-9.1 C-24 Austin, Rev. Gerard, O.P., “The Eucharist – Source of Community, Source of Action,.” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 9 November 1979. 2 cassettes.
W-9.1 Box 3 Baird, Peggy, interviewed by Deane Mowrer, February 1968. Reel-to-reel. Transcribed.
W-9.1 C-24 Barnet, Richard, talk on nuclear weapons policy, Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 15 May 1981.Cassette.
W-9.1 C-42 Baron, Virginia, “Report on Libya,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 4 May 1990. Cassette.
W-9.1 Box 3 Barry, Thomas, interviewed by Deane Mowrer, Summer 1969. Reel-to-reel (Side 2 of Charles Butterworth tape #1. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 7 Baxter, Rev. Michael, C.S.C., interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 7 November 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 5 Begin, Rev. Robert, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 21 November 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 5 Bennett-Cauchon, Leo, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 10 November 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 5 Bennett-Cauchon, Terry, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 11 November 1987. Transcribed.
W-9.1 C-46 Bernhardt, Debra, “The Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 17 January 1992. Cassette.

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Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Berrigan, Rev. Daniel, S.J.
W-9.1
C-24
Show message history
W-9.1
C-24

Talk at Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 17 September 1982. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-31

“Healing and Forgiveness: Jesus in Trouble,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 15 January 1988. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-46

“Homage to Gerard Manley Hopkins,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 15 January 1993. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-24

Talk on King of Prussia Plowshares action, Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, n.d. Cassette

W-9.1
C-24

Talk on Sermon on the Mount, Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York, n.d. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-36
Berry, Rev. Thomas, C.P., “Peace Among Peoples Through Peace with the Earth,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 27 March 1987. Cassette
W-9.1
C-13
Berry, Rev. Thomas, C.P., talk at Clarice Danielsson’s workshop, Tivoli, NY, n.d. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-46
Beseda, David, “The Cuomo Commission on the Homeless,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 8 May 1992. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-35
Beseda, David, and Sister Marion Agnes Daniel, M.S.B.T., “Homesteading on the Lower East Side – The Church and Community Rebuilding,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 23 September 1988. Cassette.

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Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Bethune, Ade
W-9.1
C-12

Interviewed by Marc Ellis, June 1978. Cassette (Side 1). Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-21

Interviewed by Nancy L. Roberts, 26 April 1983. Cassette. Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-32

“Artistic Portrayals of Meals in the Gospels, in Slides,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, 30 May 1986. Cassette.

W-9.1
Box 5

Interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 12 June 1988. Cassette. Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-41
Bharadwaj, A.B., “Living Nonviolence After Gandhi,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 29 September 1989. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-46
Bharadwaj, A.B., “Cultural Crisis in India,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 18 September 1992. Cassette.
W-9.1
Box 5
Bickham, Wilma, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 7 November 1987. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 5 Blaine, Barbara, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 2 December 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 5 Bobbitt, Wendy, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 11 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
C-28
“Boston Tea Party,” St. Leo’s Church, Milwaukee, WI, 16 December 1987. Event sponsored by Milwaukee War Tax Resistance, featuring talks by Karl Meyer on tax refusal and George Ostensen on his “Harmonic Disarmament for Life” action at the Navy’s Project ELF site near Clam Lake, Wisconsin in August 1987. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-46
Boyd, Kenneth and Mary, “Another Shade of Green,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 27 September 1991. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-42
Boylan, Kathy, and Elmer Maas and Anne Montgomery, “Divine Obedience: Ten Years of Plowshares,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 14 December 1990. Cassette.
W-9.1
Box 3
Boyle, Michael, interviewed by Deane Mowrer, 27 August 1968. Reel-to-reel.

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Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
C-42
Brackley, Rev. Dean, S.J., “Poverty, Faith and Politics,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 25 May 1990. Cassette.
W-9.1 Box 5 Bradley, Darla, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 5 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 5 Brannon, George, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 9 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 3
Brendan, Sister, “Peace and Prayer,” Catholic Worker Farm, Tivoli, NY, January, year unknown. Reel-to reel, on Side 2 of tape with conclusion of Charles Butterworth interview.
W-9.1
C-13
Brendan, Sister, talk on her visit to the Shakers, Clarice Danielsson’s workshop, Tivoli, NY, n.d. Cassette (recording begins several minutes into Side 2).
W-9.1
Brodhead, Meg
W-9.1
C-12

Interviewed by Marc Ellis, May 1978. Cassette (Side 1). Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-35

“Reflections on Plowshares Actions,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 6 January 1989. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-42
Bruderhof Community, “Discipleship Is a Life Commitment,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 9 February 1990. Cassette.
W-9.1 Box 5 Burns, Patricia, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 12 November 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 3
Butterworth, Charles, interviewed by Deane Mowrer, August 1969. Reel-to-reel. Transcribed.
W-9.1
C-26
Cabaret (talent show), Catholic Worker, New York City, July 1979. Performers include Frank Donovan (piano) and Stanley Vishnewski (skit). Cassette.
W-9.1
C-41
Callahan, Sydney, “Psychology and the Works of Mercy,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 27 October 1989. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-42
Carl, David, “An Evening of Irish Song,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 15 March 1991. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-21
Carter, Anne and Bolen, interviewed by Janice Brandon-Falcone, 25 September 1981, 25 May 1982. 2 cassettes. Original recording in the Oral History Collection, St. Louis University.
W-9.1 Box 5 Carter, Anne and Bolen, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 15 October 1987. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 5 Cartright, Marcia, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 11 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1 Box 3 Casey, Rev. Marion, interviewed by Deane Mowrer, 1969. Followed by his conference at Tivoli, summer 1967. (Participants included Dorothy Day, Caroline Gordon, and Helene Iswolsky.) Reel-to-reel. Transcribed.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Catholic Worker International Gathering, Denver, CO, 3-5 August 1990. 2 cassettes.
W-9.1
C-38

Cassette I: Roundtable on families in the Catholic Worker movement, 4 August 1990.

W-9.1
C-38

Cassette II: Roundtable on addiction, facilitated by Daniel Marshall, 4 August 1990.

W-9.1
Catholic Worker International Gathering, Chestnut Hill, MA, 3-7 July 1991. 7 cassettes.
W-9.1
C-45

Cassettes I-II: “Philosophy of the Green Revolution,” facilitated by Bill Beardslee, 4 July 1991.

W-9.1
C-45

Cassette III: Charlie King and Utah Phillips concert, 4 July 1991.

W-9.1
C-45

Cassette IV: “Non-Violence and Our Relationships within the Movement, Families, etc,” facilitated by Claire Schaeffer-Duffy, 5 July 1991.

W-9.1
C-45

Cassette V: “Catholic Worker as School: How does Learnng Take Place in the Catholic Worker?,” facilitated by Gerry Bilodeau, 5 July 1991.

W-9.1
C-45

Cassette VI: “Charism and Institution: In What Ways has the Catholic Worker Movement become Institutionalized?,” facilitated by Alice Carter,65 July 1991.

W-9.1
C-45

Cassette VII: “Soapboxing” (open mic airing of opinions on “hot button” issues within the CW movement), 6 July 1991.

W-9.1
C-41
Catholic Worker National Gathering, Darlington, NJ, 7-10 July 1983, on 14 cassettes. Sessions (in order): “Community and Movement” (Geoffrey Gneuhs), “Personalist and Generalist Alternatives to Labor and the Professions” (Thomas Cornell, Marion Moses, Jo Willard), “City and Land” (Ruth Collins, Murphy Davis, Mildred Loomis, Daniel Marshall, Chris Montesano), “Spirituality and Peacemaking” (Eileen Egan, Brian Terrell, Joseph Zarrella), “Family and Catholic Worker Community” (Anne Clune), “Health and Hospitality” (Albrecht Heyer, Pam Noone, Jacques Travers), “Land Trusts and Landholding Reform”: (Betsy Corner, Charles Matthei), “Cottage Industries” (Ade Bethune, Mary Mullins), “Aims and Purposes” (Chris Montesano, Jeannette Noel, Peggy Scherer), Cassette XIII: Interviews of Don Hoffman and Chuck Smith, by Gene Palumbo, Cassette XIV: Songs performed by Robert W. Bleakney.
W-9.1
C-9
Catholic Worker National Gathering, Milwaukee, WI, 20-22 June 1986. Sessions (in order): Plenary (welcome by Archbishop Weakland and introductions), “Welfare System and CW” (David Stein), “Ploughshares Actions,” (Paul Magno; incomplete), “Daybreak” (one woman show on Dorothy Day by Miriam Healy), Mass (Rev. William Brennan, S.J.), slide show on CW pacifism (Anne Klejment), “Violence in CW houses” (Pat Coy). 6 Cassettes.
W-9.1
Box 5
Catinella, Gayle, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 2 December 1987. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 5 Cebula, Sr. Jan, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 13 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 5 Chaps, Bob, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 19 November 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1
C-24
Chartier, Richard, “Latin America, Where Tomorrow Struggles to be Born,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 25 September 1981. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-12
Chesire, Sprague, interviewed by Marc Ellis, May 1978. Cassette. Transcribed.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
C-27
Chicago Catholic Worker 50th Anniversary Celebration, 5-7 December 1986. 6 cassettes.
W-9.1
C-27

Cassette I: Talks by Edward Marciniak (reading paper by James O’Gara) and Arthur Falls, and introductions, Loyola University, 5 December 1986.

W-9.1
C-27

Cassette II: Utah Phillips Concert, Loyola University, 5 December 1986.

W-9.1
C-27

Cassette III: “The Chicago Catholic Worker in the ‘30s, ‘40s and ‘50s,” Loyola University, 6 December 1986. Speakers include Msgr. John Hayes, Nina Polcyn Moore, Jack Woltjen, and Joseph Zarrella.

W-9.1
C-27

Cassette IV: “Pacifism in the Catholic Worker,” facilitated by Karl Meyer, Loyola University, 6 December 1986.

W-9.1
C-27

Cassette V: “The Catholic Worker Today,” and “Future Visions of the Catholic Worker,” Loyola University, 6 December 1986. Speakers include Barbara Blaine, David Buer, Gayle Catinella, David Stein, Brian Terrell, and Joseph Zarrella.

W-9.1
C-27

Cassette VI: “Personalism in the Catholic Worker,” facilitated by James Eder, Loyola University, 6 December 1986.

W-9.1
Box 5 Childress, Teka, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 13 October 1987. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
C-27
CHIPS (Christian Help in Park Slope), Brooklyn, New York, “An Oral History of the Foundation of the CHIPS Shelter.” Interviews by Daniel Marshall, 1981. 11 cassettes.
W-9.1
C-24
Chittester, Sr. Joan, O.S.B., “Benedictinism and Its Contribution Today,” talk at Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, 12 December 1980. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-36
“Civil Disobedience,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 23 October 1987. Roundtable discussion with Meg Hyre, Tim Lambert, and Carl Siciliano. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-31
Clark, Ramsey, “Grenada Reconsidered,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, 22 June 1984. Cassette.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Box 5 Cleaver, Richard, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 1 November 1989. 2 cassettes. Transcribed. (Conclusion on Side 2 of first Bob Chaps cassette.)
W-9.1
Box 5 Cleveland Catholic Workers, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 21 January 1988. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 5 Coday, Dennis, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 13 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
C-31
Coddington, Dorothy Weston, “In the Beginning of the Catholic Worker,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 26 June 1987. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-44 Collins, George, interviewed by Deane Mowrer, 13 June 1986. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-44 Collins, George, interviewed by William Alcorn, August 1991. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-43
Collins, Ruth, “Real Estate and Catholic Worker Philosophy,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 17 May 1991. Cassette.
W-9.1
Box 5 Cooper, John, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 15 November 1987. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Corbin, Martin J.
W-9.1
Box 2

Commentaries on Lanza del Vasto, the Just War theory, civil rights, and Vatican II’s pronouncements on peace, WBAI-FM. New York City, 2, 16, and 30 July and 6 September 1965.

W-9.1
Box 2

Commentary on the Marxist-Christian dialogue, WBAI-FM, New York City, 26 August 1965. Cassette (Cassette II, Side 1, of Dorothy Day’s 12 March 1965 talk).

W-9.1
Box 5 Cordaro, Angela, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 11 July 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Cordaro, Frank
W-9.1
C-21

Discussion of the document “Moral Clarity in the Nuclear Age,” with Michael Novak, St. John’s University, Collegeville, MN, 27 February 1984. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-22

“World View and U.S. Fascism,” St. John’s University, Collegeville, MN 11 May 1984. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-22

“A Faithful Response in a ‘Bombfull’ World: Non-violent Resistance and Civil Disobedience,” talk at “Journey to Peace,” Minneapolis, MN, 3 November 1984. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-22

“Competing Histories: How to Reclaim a Past with a Future in Mind,” talk at “Journey to Peace,” Minneapolis, MN, 4 November 1984. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-22

Talks to R.O.T.C. members, St. Cloud State University (Side 1) and St. John’s University (Side 2), St. Cloud and Collegeville, MN, 18 and 19 April 1985. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-37

“Priesthood and Resistance – A Developing Ministry,” Creighton University, Omaha, NE, 29 March 1989. Cassette.

W-9.1
Box 5

Interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 26 August 1989. Cassette. Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-39

“Promoting Domestic and International Peace Through Civil Disobedience,” keynote address at the annual symposium of the Iowa Chapter, National Association of Social Workers, 11 April 1991. 120 minute cassette.

W-9.1
C-49

“Violence, Nonviolence, Family, and Society,” social worker conference, Des Moines, IA, 11 April 1991. Cassette (Side 1).

W-9.1
C-39

“Jesus the Non-Violent Resister: A Call for a Resistance Church,” Conception Seminary, Conception, MO, 23 April 1991. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-49

“Consistent Life Ethics,” St. Thomas Aquinas Church, Ames, IA, 20 October 1991. Cassette (Side 1).

W-9.1
C-49

“Why a Christian Should Be in Jail,” Ames, IA, 18 February 1993. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-53

“Teaching Social Justice,” Religious Education Program, Iowa Falls, Iowa, 26 October 1995. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-58

Broadcast interview, Wisconsin Public Radio, Madison, WI, 25 August 1998. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-58

“Experiences Doing a Plowshares Action,” public talk, Madison, WI, 25 August 1998. With Rev. Larry Morlan. Cassette.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Cordaro, Tom
W-9.1
Box 5

Interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 17 August 1986. Cassette. Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-46

Broadcast interview, St. Thomas University, Miami, FL, 28 June 1994. Cassette.

W-9.1
Cornell, Thomas C.
W-9.1
Box 2

Interviewed by Deane Mowrer, 5 June 1968. Reel-to-reel. Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-26

“Report from Nicaragua,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 16 February 1979. (Program also includes discussion of Puebla by Florence Anderson and Rev. Gilberto Gorgulho, O.P.) 120 minute cassette.

W-9.1
Box 4

“Dorothy Day and the Years of Confrontation,” Talk at the Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 24 May 1985 (with Eileen Egan).(Reel-to-reel)

W-9.1
C-35

“The Catholic Worker in an Age of Bureaucracy,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting,” New York City, 6 May 1988. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-58

Interviewed by Rosalie Troester, June 1988 (with Monica Cornell). 5 Cassettes.

W-9.1
C-46

“Remembering Igal Roodenko,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 11 October 1991 (with Eileen Egan). Cassette.

W-9.1
C-58

Interviewed by Rev. George M. Anderson, 18 May 2002 (with Monica Cornell). 2 Cassettes.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Cort, John C.
W-9.1
C-45

Interviewed by Geoffrey Gneuhs, 25 January 1978. Cassette, Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-24

“Eric Gill, The Catholic Worker, and Socialism,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 13 June 1980. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-31

“What Is Christian Socialism?” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 12 February 1988. Cassette.

W-9.1
Box 5

Interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 13 June 1988. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.

W-9.1
C-41

“In Memory of Michael Harrington,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 6 October 1989. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-21
Cowley, Malcolm, Interviewed by William D. Miller, 5 August 1976. Cassette (Side 1). Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 5
Coy, Patrick G., interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 14 December 1987. 2 cassettes. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 5
Cullen Michael, interviewed by Rosalie Troester, 4 July 1987. Cassette. Transcribed.
W-9.1
Box 2
Cullen, Michael, talk at Catholic Worker Farm, Tivoli, NY, June 1973. Reel-to-reel.
W-9.1
Cunneen, Joseph
W-9.1
C-24

Cross Currents and the Convergence of Contemporary Catholic Thought,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 6 March 1981. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-24

“Can We Resist Mass Culture?” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 16 October 1981, Cassette.

W-9.1
C-36

“What if the Church Were Catholic?” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 9 January 1987. Cassette.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
C-35
Cunneen, Sally, “Re-Imagining Mother Church: Insights on Education,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 9 December 1988. Cassette.
W-9.1
Danielsson, Clarice
W-9.1
C-20

Interviewed by Deane Mowrer, 15 and 27 October 1974. 2 Cassettes. Cassette I (October 15): Side 1, ca. 5 minutes on Side 2. Cassette II (October 27): Side 1. Cassette II transcribed; Cassette I of poor quality.

W-9.1
C-42

“Shared Housing – The ‘Christ Room’ in Action,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 11 May 1990 (with Sr. Adrian Hofstetter). Cassette.

W-9.1
Box 3

Talks at Catholic Worker Farm, Tivoli, NY, n.d. Side 1: Talk on Kibbutzim, 12 January; Side 2: Talk on Gandhi, with Father Lyle Young. Reel-to-reel.

W-9.1
C-12
Davenport Catholic Worker Community (Marty Buckley, Fr. Marvin Mottet, Margaret Quigley, Ray Surean, interviewed by Frank Termini, 12 January 1975. Cassette. Poor quality recording.
W-9.1
C-43
Davies, Lindy, “The Economic Theory of Henry George Today,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 26 April 1991. 2 Cassettes.
W-9.1
C-46
Davis, Felton, “Human Suffering in Iraq,” 30 September 1991, Cassette.
W-9.1
C-43
Davis, Florence, “Catholic Social Action in New York in the ‘40s and ‘50s,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 5 October 1990. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-46
Davis, Florence, “The Impact of Capitalism on Native People in Canada,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 25 October 1991. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-41
Davis, Murphy. See: Catholic Worker National Gathering.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Day, Dorothy
W-9.1
Box 10

“The Pacifist Views of the Catholic Worker,” Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, 7 February 1958. (CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box )

W-9.1
Box 10

Interviewed by Mike Wallace, Gallery of Colorful Characters, WNTA-TV, New York City, 9 September 1959 (date taped). (CD; copied from original in the Mike Wallace Collection, George Arents Research Library, Syracuse University.)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at Blackfriars, San Francisco, CA, 15 March 1960. (CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box 4.

W-9.1
Box 10

“The Catholic Worker and Pacifism,” broadcast interview by Fr. Eugene Boyle, KPFA Radio, Berkeley, CA, recorded 17 March 1960 and broadcast 3 May 1960. (CD). Available from Pacifica Radio Archives, 3729 Cahuenga Boulevard, West, North Hollywood, CA 91604.

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at the University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, CA, 21 March 1960. (CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box 1.)

W-9.1
Box 1

Interviewed by Fr. John Catoir, 13 May 1964. (Reel-to-reel)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at joint meeting of Franciscan Fraters of Old Mission Santa Barbara and Catholic Human Relations Council of Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara, CA, 12 March 1965. (CD; also onreel-to-reel, Box 3)

W-9.1
Box 10

“Witness: Dorothy Day,” produced by the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, Santa Barbara, CA, 20 September 1965. Includes portions of Day’s talk at the Center, summer 1964, and comments on Day by John Cogley, Ammon Hennacy, and Michael Harrington. (CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box 1) Available online from the Department of Special Collections, University of California, Santa Barbara, at http://digital.library.ucsb.edu/items/show/5387.

W-9.1
Box 10

“Poverty and the Christian Commitment,” Social Action Forum, New York University, 12 November 1965. ( CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box )1 Original tape is by WBAI-FM, New York.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Box 10

“Who Is My Brother’s Keeper?” State University of New York at Geneseo, 6 October 1966. (CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box 1)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talks on “The Urban Poor,” and “Community,” Peacemaker Conference, Tivoli, NY, summer 1967. (CD; also onAlso on reel-to-reel, Box 3)

W-9.1
Box 10

“Blessed Are the Poor,” St. Paul Seminary, St. Paul, MN, 5 May 1969, (CD)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk followed by discussion period, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, 24 September 1969. Introduced by Michael Cullen; preceded by Kenneth Feit reading his poems on the Milwaukee 14. (CD)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk in Melbourne, Australia, 6 August 1970. ( CD)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk on Trip to Australia, India and Africa (incomplete), Tivoli, NY, 18 October 1970. (CD; preceded by Deane Mowrer’s dictation of notes for CW article, which erased a portion of the talk.)

W-9.1
C-13

Talk on trip to Australia, India, and Africa, Tivoli, NY, 1970. Main topics: Tanzania, youth movement in U.S. Cassette (Side 1, ca. 10 minutes).

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk on trip to Russia, Tivoli, NY, August 1971 (Feast of the Assumption). (CD; also on reel-to-reel, Box 3) Conclusion of talk missing.

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at the Ohio Catholic Education Association Convention, Cincinnati, OH, 30 September 1971.(CD).

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, 7 March 1972. (CD).

W-9.1
Box 10

Talks at Clarice Danielsson’s conference, Tivoli, NY, 1972. (CD) Conclusion of second talk not recorded.

W-9.1
C-15

Interviewed by Douglas Lavine, 10 January 1973. 2 Cassettes (Side 1 of Cassette II).

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at Peacemaker conference, Tivoli, NY, 26 May 1974, on Peter Maurin and land trusts. (CD)

W-9.1
Box 10

Talk at Peacemaker conference, Tivoli, NY, 24 June 1975. (CD).

W-9.1
Box 10

“Reconciliation with the Poor and Alienated,” Eastern General Conference on the Charismatic Renewal in the Catholic Church, Atlantic City, NJ, 12 October 1975. (CD).

W-9.1
C-58

Remarks to residents of federal women’s prison, Alderson , WV, 20 and 22 November 1975. 2 Cassettes. (Copies. Originals are in the Institute of Women Today Records, Marquette University Archives.)

W-9.1
C-32

Remarks on her installation as a Cathedral Colleague, followed by sermon by Paul Lachance, O.F.M., Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City, March (?) 1976, Side 1 only. Cassette.

W-9.1
Box 10

See also: PAX Conference, 1-3 August 1969.

W-9.1
Box 10

See also: “Peace and the Catholic Conscience”

W-9.1
Day, Dorothy (subject)
W-9.1
C-40

“In Memory of Dorothy Day: An Informal Gathering,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 9 November 1990. Cassette.

W-9.1
C-20

See also: “The Catholic Worker and History.”

W-9.1
C-9
. See also: Catholic Worker National Gathering, Milwaukee, WI..
W-9.1
C-22

See also: Cornell, Thomas C., “Dorothy Day and the Years of Confrontation.”

W-9.1
C-35

See also: Egan, Eileen, “Dorothy Day’s November of the Soul.”

W-9.1
C-38

See also Forest, James H., talk on Dorothy Day.

W-9.1
C-40

See also: Gilliam, Robert, “Dorothy Day and the Uses of Force.”

W-9.1
C-21

See also: Miller, William D., interview on his biography of Dorothy Day.

W-9.1
C-21

See also: Miller, William D., talk on Dorothy Day.

W-9.1
C-23
See also: Naughton, Michael, “Should Dorothy Day be Canonize?”
W-9.1
C-23

See also: Schuable, Virginia, “The Life and Influence of Dorothy Day.”

W-9.1
C-41

See also: Sulsona, Michael, and Beryl Wing, “We The People – A Play Based on the Life of Dorothy Day.”

W-9.1
C-35
Dear, John, S.J., “Jean Donovan and the Call to Discipleship,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 30 October 1987. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-39
Dear, John. See also: Egan, Eileen, “Toward a Peace Church: The Vow of Nonviolence.”
W-9.1
C-46
Deats, Richard, “Muriel Lester – Friend of Gandhi, Ambassador of Peace,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 4 October 1991. Cassette.

DD-CW
Series W-9.1

Series
Drawer/Box
Description
W-9.1
C-31
Dillon, Peg, M.M., “Nicaragua: Personal Experiences and Reflections,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 12 February 1982. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-24
Dinter, Rev. Paul, “The Church Confronts the Nuclear Threat,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 2 October 1981. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-35
Dinter, Rev. Paul, “The Eucharist as Model for Reconciliation,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 29 April 1988. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-46
Doering-Lewis, Tess, “Czeslaw Milosz – Moral Conscience in a Secular Society,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 16 October 1992. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-31
Dolci, Danilo, “Non-violence in Education and Social Building,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 13 February 1983. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-35
Donders, Rev. Joseph, “African Christianity and the Pursuit of Peace,” Catholic Worker Friday Night Meeting, New York City, 25 March 1988. Cassette.
W-9.1
C-3
Donovan, Frank, interviewed by Paul Gratke, 24 September
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Poor Clares

The Poor Clares, an order begun by St Clare, friend to St Francis, began as a vegetarian one. May God cause it to return to that discipline.

The only diet for a peacemaker is a vegetarian diet

The only diet for a peacemaker is a vegetarian diet

Father John Dear  http://frjohndear.org

National Catholic Reporter | Home | National Catholic Reporter

In Fort Lauderdale, Fla., last week to speak at the National Convention of Unitarian Universalists, I met my old friend Bruce Friedrich. We spent eight memorable months together in a tiny jail cell, along with Philip Berrigan, for our 1993 Plowshares disarmament action. A former Catholic Worker, Bruce is now one of the leaders of PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. He gave a brilliant workshop on the importance of becoming a vegetarian, something I urge everyone to consider.

I became a vegetarian with a few other Jesuit novices shortly after I entered the Jesuits in 1982 and later wrote a pamphlet for PETA, “Christianity and Vegetarianism.” I based my decision solely on Francis Moore Lappe’s classic work, Diet for a Small Planet, a book that I think everyone should read.

In it, Lappe, the great advocate for the hungry, makes an unassailable case that vegetarianism is the best way to eliminate world hunger and to sustain the environment.

At first glance, we wonder how that could be. But it’s undisputable. A hundred million tons of grain go yearly for biofuel — a morally questionable use of foodstuffs. But more than seven times that much — some 760 million tons according to the United Nations — go into the bellies of farmed animals, this to fatten them up so that sirloin, hamburgers and pork roast grace the tables of First-World people. It boils down to this. Over 70 percent of U.S. grain and 80 percent of corn is fed to farm animals rather than people.

Conscience dictates that the grain should stay where it is grown, from South America to Africa. And it should be fed to the local malnourished poor, not to the chickens destined for our KFC buckets. The environmental think-tank, the World Watch Institute, sums it up: “Continued growth in meat output is dependent on feeding grain to animals, creating competition for grain between affluent meat eaters and the world’s poor.”

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Meanwhile, eating meat causes almost 40 percent more greenhouse-gas emissions than all the cars, trucks, and planes in the world combined. (The world’s 1.3 billion cattle release tons of methane into the atmosphere, and hundreds of millions tons of CO2 are released by burning forests due to dry conditions as in California or due to purposeful burns to create cow pastures in Latin America.)

And global warming isn’t the only environmental issue. Almost 40 years ago, Lappe spelled out the environmental consequences of eating meat in stark relief. But more recently, her analysis received some high-power validation. The United Nations recently published “Livestock’s Long Shadow.” It concludes that eating meat is “one of the most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global.” And it insists that the meat industry “should be a major policy focus when dealing with problems of land degradation, climate change and air pollution, water shortage and water pollution, and loss of biodiversity.”

Much of our potable water and much of our fossil fuel supply is wasted on rearing chickens, pigs, and other animals for humans to eat. And over 50 percent of forests worldwide have been cleared to raise or feed livestock for meat-eating. (A recent protest in Brazil denounced Kentucky Fried Chicken for clearing thousands of acres of untouched Amazon rain forest for chicken feed.)

As a Christian, I became a vegetarian because of the Gospel mandate of Matthew 25, “Whatever you did to the least of these, you did to me” — because I do not want my appetites to contribute to the ongoing oppression of the world’s starving masses. As a Catholic and Jesuit, I want somehow to side with the poor and hungry.

But another issue arises, too, over the decades, I’ve learned that our appetite for meat leads to cruelty to animals — chickens pressed wing-to-wing into filthy sheds and de-beaked, for example. And since I’ve always espoused creative nonviolence as the fundamental Gospel value, my vegetarianism helps me not to participate in the vicious torture and destruction of billions of cows, chickens, and so many other creatures.

The chickens never raise families, root in the soil, build nests, or do anything natural. Often they are tormented or tortured before they are slowly killed, as PETA has repeatedly documented in its undercover investigations — for your chicken dinner or hamburger. (All this is documented on a video narrated by Alec Baldwin, at www.Meat.org.)

Animals have feelings, they suffer; they have needs and desires. They were created by God to raise their families and breath fresh air; and if chickens to peck in the grass, if pigs to root in the soil. Today’s farms don’t let them do anything God designed them to do. Animal scientists attest that farm animals have personalities and interests, that chickens and pigs are smarter than dogs and cats.

Animals figure in the Gospels. They brim with lovely, respectful images of animals. Clearly Jesus was familiar with animals, and cared for them, as he urged us to look at the birds of the air or be his sheep. He even identified himself as “a mother hen who longs to gather us under her wings.”

And animals figure in the Hebrew Bible. Isaiah 11, a vision of reconciled creation, dreams of a day when “the wolf shall be a guest of the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; the calf and the young lion shall browse together with a little child to guide them. The cow and the beast shall be neighbors, together their young shall rest. The lion shall eat hay like the ox. The baby shall play by the cobra’s den and the child lay his hand on the adder’s lair. There shall be no harm or ruin on all my holy mountain, for the earth shall be filled with knowledge of the God of peace, as water covers the sea.” (Isaiah 11:1-9)

A vision of a nonviolent world, all creatures nonviolent, children safely at play with them, and no violence anywhere. That is the peaceful vision of creation that we are called to pursue — in every aspect of our lives, from the jobs we hold, to our use of gasoline and alternative energies, to what we eat and wear, say and do.

I admire the Bible’s greatest vegetarian, Daniel, the nonviolent resister who refused to defile himself by eating the king’s meat. He and three friends became healthier than anyone else through their vegetarian diet. And they excelled in wisdom, for “God rewards them with knowledge and skill in all learning and wisdom.”

In his workshop at the Unitarian Universalists convention, Bruce added another beautiful image, the Garden of Eden. The Bible opens with a vision of paradise where God, animals, and humans recreate in peace together. Clearly, the Bible calls us to return to that paradise.

And Bruce reminded us that from the beginning we are directed to be vegetarians. Genesis 1:29 says, “See, I give you every seed-bearing plant all over the earth and every tree that has seed-bearing fruit on it to be your food.”

Biblical images and justice issues aside, there are medical reasons to stop eating meat. Vegetarian diets help keep our weight down, support a lifetime of good health and provide protection against numerous diseases, including the U.S.’s three biggest killers: heart disease, cancer and strokes.

Dr. Dean Ornish and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn both have 100 percent success in preventing and reversing heart disease using a vegan diet. Meanwhile, Dr. T. Colin Campbell writes that one of the leading causes of human cancer is animal protein. More, vegetarians are also less prone to developing adult-onset diabetes. And then we have to contend with the spread of Mad Cow disease and Avian influenza. One could almost argue that the human body is not designed for meat-eating.

But for me being vegetarian boils down to peacemaking. If you want to be a peacemaker, Bruce said, reflecting the sentiments of Leo Tolstoy, you will want to eat as peaceful a diet as possible. “Vegetarianism,” Tolstoy wrote, “is the taproot of humanitarianism.” Other great humanitarians like Mahatma Gandhi, Albert Schweitzer and Thich Nhat Hanh agree. The only diet for a peacemaker is a vegetarian diet.

“Not to hurt our humble brethren, the animals,” St. Francis of Assisi said, “is our first duty to them, but to stop there is not enough. We have a higher mission: to be of service to them whenever they require it. If you have people who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity,” he continued, “you will have people who will deal likewise with other people.”

So it was good to visit with my friend Bruce, and hear once again the wisdom of vegetarianism. It’s a key ingredient in the new life of peace, compassion and nonviolence.

John’s autobiography, A Persistent Peace, (with a foreword by Martin Sheen), available Aug. 1, can be ordered at Amazon.com: Online Shopping for Electronics, Apparel, Computers, Books, DVDs & more. See also: www.persistentpeace.com. John’s pamphlet “Christianity and Vegetarianism” can be read online at www.peta.org or free copies of the pamphlet or a free CD of John reading the pamphlet can be ordered by sending an email to VegInfo@peta.org. You can listen to or download John reading the pamphlet at www.ChristianVeg.com. See also: www.johndear.org.

Catholic Vegans

Following Jesus’ Nonviolent Diet: Catholic Vegetarians In History And Now

“Greater things shall you do than i have done”
said Jesus Christ to his followers:

“What you have done to these the least of my brethren you have done
unto me.” Did Jesus by this mean the voiceless murdered animals?

catholic vegetarian saints

for three centuries after Jesus’ death, early Christians followed His
vegetarian diet. There is debate about Jesus and fish consumption but
His absention from mammal and bird flesh is rarely disputed. This
abstention from flesh began to disappear when Emperor Constantine, a
warring pagan,
convened the Council of Nicea in 325 AD and presided over it. Many books
then were cut from the Bible, including the Gospel of Mary and the Gospel of
Thomas, both of whom were vegetarians, Mary from the time she was a young
girl.

St francis of assisi, St Martin de Porres, St clare, stigmatist St Therese neumann,
St john chrysostom, St anthony of padua who
preached to fishes when humans would not listen.. believed they were
following the example of jesus in not eating his animals. Trappists,
Cistercians, Benedictines, Franciscans all have had a tradition of
vegetarian diet, to which many still adhere. The pretzel was, wrote
George cornell former ap religion writer a lenten bread, symbolizing
arms folded in prayer.. lentils were named as such because they were
a lenten vegetarian alternative to animal flesh. meatless fridays
were the last vestige of early christian abstinence from meat in
following
christ’s example. a papal bull once excommunicated anyone who
attended a bullfight because the barbaric cruelty in them. this was
later amended to excommunicate only priests who blessed
bullfighting.

biblical origins

genesis 1: 29, isaiah 65, daniel 1 exodus 26: 34 are some of the
thousands of quotes in the bible on vegetarian diet. the command to
feed the hungry, given by jesus in his sermon on the mount, implies
vegetarianism since the flesh of animals yields 100 to 1000 lbs an
acre, dairy products around 10,000 lbs. an acre, some vegetables,
81,000 lbs. an acre, and fruits from centenarian fruit trees 450,000
or more lbs. an acre. therefore genesis fruit trees yield 450 times
what slaughterhouses yield. daniel o’steen, of national right to
life, felt he must be consistent in his prolife stance and so many
years ago became a vegetarian. paul obis, founder of vegetarian
times, is a chicago catholic who cares deeply about not hurting
others’ feelings in regards to diet. his wife clare, mother of 6
boys, created a successful media campaign when mike royko refused to
allow her vegetarian gluten ribs in his cooking contest. fr. ron
lengwin of kdka radio in pittsburgh believes that the apple adam ate
was the first heart of a butchered animal. rep dennis kucinich
(democrat cleveland) is a vegan who has worked for the rights of blue
collar laborers, for the
environment, and for peace. vegetarian monasteries in massachusetts,
new york, kentucky, ohio serve only meatless meals.. ron pickarsky,
former catholic brother, now married,
has worked with commercial establishments helping them to transition
http://www.eco-cuisine.com
jb exec of an ohio corporation, rings a bell for the knights of
columbus in public places, and has in the past inquired where he
could get vegan no feather sleeping bags to be consistent in his
vegetarian diet. d. marshall, new york homeless shelter worker, is a
vegetarian who does not proselytize the poor who come in to his
welcoming inn. catholic colleges such as georgetown have responded to
the growing number of their vegan students by providing options.
thomas merton, author of seven story mountain and trappist monk, was
a vegetarian, and activist for interfaith cooperation. for this he
may have been murdered. el, new york environmentalist, poet, and
mystic, originally became vegetarian for economic reasons, while one
of his teachers, fr. daniel berrigan, eats no meat. cw, catholic
nurse, was nursing her child one day when a mosquito landed on her
arm. she decided to nurse him too. one catholic seminarian
experimented with pot once.. and his perceptions slowed down. the
chicken leg he was gnawing on became the leg of a chicken. that day
he stopped eating meat and stopped smoking pot. a catholic secretary
for cleveland amory’s fund for animals became vegan. k fromer blanc,
brooklyn nun, is a vegetarian as are millions of other catholics.
father mario mazzoleni, now deceased, wrote on his decision to become
vegetarian. his book is translated
by a notre dame professor.the temptation to eat meat is chemical in
nature, as the uric acid in meat is more addictive than caffein since
it is trioxypurine or 3 oxypurines while caffein is dioxypurine or 2.
exodus 26: 34 is a command not to kill. governor jesse ventura in
reference to the death penalty (for animals too) has said that that
command is not asterisked with exceptions. st thomas in the thomasine
gospel
has many references to the fruiteating of christ. thomas, the
skeptical apostle, went to madras india where even today are millions
of catholic descendants of his preaching.
cesar chavez, the saintly activist for the rights of farm workers,
continued the tradition of nonviolence in his labor organizing as
well as his diet. he and gandhi looked to leo tolstoy, russian
catholic, who wrote the kingdom of god is within you.
albert of michigan, a catholic paraplegic, has spent much time
researching catholic vegetarianism in history. he says that the
word ‘opsarian’ means ‘pickled fish’ and is the greek word for the
fish jesus created, meaning that jesus did not materialize freshly
suffocated fish but materialized processed fish.
http://www.nofishing.net
francisco martin, madrid spain secretary of the ivu
http://www.ivu.org is a catholic vegan activist. colman mccarthy,
former trappist and syndicated columnist, lectures around the world
on peace studies and has long been mostly fruitarian. bruce
friedrich, catholic of peta, ran their jesus was vegetarian campaign.
(http://www.jesusveg.com) st blaize’s throat protection is not
necessary if one stops
eating innocent fishes, suffocated and smothered, with their eyes and
throats ripped out by vicious hooks. http://www.nofishing.net the
countries with the most
fish consumption have the most stomach cancer. many members of the
catholic worker community as their founder dorothy day follow
vegetarian diet
in matthew 25 and many other homes. http://www.catholicworker.org
http://www.paxchristiusa.org dr. virginia bourquardez, who once
hitchhiked for the first time at the age of 77 when her ride
dematerialized,
worked her entire life for animals, and became a vegetarian in her
70’s.
malcolm muggeridge the british intellectual abstained from meat in
later years..
helen jones of the national catholic soc. for animal welfare worked
with her
sister ruth out of their clark summit pennsylvania home. leonardo da
vinci,
a catholic, was also a fruitarian. danny devito protects insect life
as well
as mammals.

in numbers 22:28, god speaks through balaam’s donkey about balaam’s
beating the innocent animal.

christian vegetarian sites
http://www.egroups.com/messages/catholicveg http://www.jesusveg.com
http://www.compassionatespirit.com http://www.all-creatures.org
http://www.hacres.com http://www.egroups.com/messages/salvarmy/2
/> others
http://www.pcrm.org http://www.notmilk.comhttp://www.madcowboy.com
http://www.ivu.org http//www.acorn.net/fruitarian
http://www.meatout.com http://www.wfad.org
http://www.animalsagenda.org
tp://www.peta.net http://www.hsus.org
http://groups.msn.com/bioterror
/>
http://www.egroups.com/messages/catholicveg/118
/>
http://groups.msn.com/stopmowing
/> fr. mario mazzoleni on his decision to become vegetarian (after 3
years as a strict vegetarian, fr. mario mazzoleni speaks of a desire
for meat. * see above
the addictive trioxypurine in meat) i would be a hypocrite if i led
the reader to believe that i was strong enough to be perfectly
faithful to my lenten resolution. ..i
hadn’t yet completely resolved my desire for meat – and so the
repressed desire
was floating to the surface. it is a fact that the minute i would sit
down to meditate, the most succulent meals would pass in front of my
mind, full of fragrant roasted chickens and various sausages. what to
do? if i was going to ruin all my meditations for a
roast chicken, it would be better to eliminate the problem by facing
it head on. and so after 3 years of strict vegetarianism, i decided
to get rid of the desire once and for all by satiating myself with a
meat dinner. after all, i told myself to quiet my sense of
guilt, “it isn’t a crime to eat meat, and i can’t say that because
i’m vegetarian i’m better than many people who are carnivorous.” it
was almost a traumatic experience. i remembered an analogous
experience of gandhi’s that he recounted in his autobiography.
convinced by a friend that india could be liberated only by the grit
of someone who ate meat, he hid himself on a river bank to consume
some barbecued baby goat meat, and the next night he could feel
bleating in his chest. instead of enjoying the coveted snack in
peace, the minute this little faithbreaker set his teeth into the
cruel repast* (* a reference to dante’s inferno.. in which
meat is described as a cruel repast in xxxiii.1) he was himself
bitten by remorse and anxiety. i kept seeing the animal alive in
front of me, and this inhibited the desire that was so enticing when
it was simply mental. i immediately noticed some other effects,
physical as well as psychic. my intestines held that food much longer
than they kept vegetables,and my sense of smell, made sensitive by
several years of vegetarianism,
was able to detect the odor of the cooked animal on my skin. it was a
disagreeable sensation. as for my psyche, i noticed that my mind,
which during my 3 year “lent” was no longer seriously agitated by
unwanted thoughts, suffered a set back from that carne-vale (meat
festival); polluting throughts started to enter again in triumph. it
was a lesson. as always it is experience more than words that has the
greater power of persuasion. the decision to adopt a vegetarian diet
was motivated also by a religious actor. i knew that i was going to a
sacred place.
quoted from don mario mazzoleni’s book, published by leela press of
faber, virginia usa
genesis 1: 29 behold i have given you herbyielding seed.
to you it shall be for meat. (the fruitarian garden of eden)
methusaleh.. the oldest man in the bible, achieved 969
orbits of the sun.
exodus: 26: 34 thou shalt not kill (not asterisked with
exceptions)
jesus: ye are whited sepulchres (greek sarcophagi sarx flesh ..phagi
eater)
jesus threw the butchers out of the temple. daniel was vegetarian
in the lions’ den and therefore was
not harmed. daniel was in jail 10 days and his
condition as a vegetarian was better than those who
were not.
paul: if your flesheating offends your brother, forego it.
jesus: feed the hungry (450 times as many people per acre
can be fed tree products in comparison to slaughterhouse
products)
many catholics are praying that the holy father who takes such a
strong stand
in preventing the violence of war and execution, will withdraw his
endorsement of the cruelty of lab research. many catholic churches
have blessing of the animals ceremonies.

abba in the name of jesus thank you that you are now ending all
violence to people, animals, and all beings on your planet now and
forever.

jesuit priest father john dear sj on his vegetarianism and war resistance
http://bak.postpoems.org/authors/animalpoems/poem/345507
/>
the book vegetarian christian saints by holly roberts
http://www.amazon.com/vegetarian-christian-saints-holly-roberts/dp/0975484400

http://bak.postpoems.org/authors/animalpoems articles by many christian
vegetarian leaders john wesley of the methodists, general bramwell booth
of the salvation army, ellen white of the seventh day adventists

http://www.amazon.com/wounded-innocence-sketches-theology-art/dp/0814651127/ref=\
\
sr_1_1?ie=utf8&qid=1369152136&sr=8-1&keywords=alejandro+rivera alejandro rivera
writes beautifully of martin de porres

st jerome letter on concern for all creation
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/catholicveg/message/1673
/>

*********
in christianity, contraception, papal infallibility, married and women priests,
reincarnation

in christianity, contraception, papal infallibility, married and women priests,
reincarnation, vegetarianism

vegetarianism:

for 3 centuries after the death of jesus, early christians practiced jesus’
vegetarian diet. jesus was an essene from galilee. paul too took the nazarene
vow which included being vegetarian. in 325, appointees of the emperor,
constantine, a nonvegetarian, removed at the council of nice references to
jesus’ vegetarianism. jesus had thrown out of the temple the moneychangers…
secondary to their role as butchers of animals to be sacrificed. isaiah: “i
delight not in your blood sacrifice”. genesis 1:29 had proclaimed a fruitarian
diet based on
foods given by trees vines bushes and plants without killing
the plant or fruits, nuts, berries, seeds, eggplant, squash, beans, peas,
tomatoes, etc. “behold i have given you herbyielding seed. to you that shall be
for meat.” father lengwin has hypthosesized that the apple eaten by adam and eve
was
actually the first heart of a butchered animal.

reincarnation:

“emperor justinian wanted origen’s writings and teachings to be condemned and
destroyed but pope vigilius refused to sign a papal decree condemning origen’s
teachings on reincarnation. as a result of his disobedience, the emperor had the
pope arrested and put into jail. in 543, justinian convoked the fifth general
council of the church and told the pope he would sign into doctrine whatever the
council decided. on the way there, under guard, the pope escaped to avoid being
forced to condemn origen’s writings. the emperor commanded the council to
continue despite the pope’s refusal to attend.”

from http://www.adishakti.org/_/great_cover_up_…incarnation.htm
/>
fallibility or infallibility:

it was not until 1870, nearly 1900 years after jesus’ death, that pius ix called
and controlled a vatican council which declared him and future popes infallible
when speaking ‘ex cathedra’ or from the
papal chair.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/13/opinion/new-pope-ive-given-up-hope.html?_r=0

http://www.bible.ca/catholic-flip-flops-pope-infallible.htm
“no pope was considered infallible until 1870 ad.

pope adrian vi – it is certain that the pontiff … may err in those things
which pertain to faith.
pope paul iv – i do not doubt that i and my predecessors may sometimes have
erred.
archbishop purcell said in his debate with alexander campbell in cincinnati
on 1-13-1837: “the bishop of rome, though he was not believed to be infallible.
neither is he now. no enlightened catholic holds the pope’s infallibility of be
an article of faith. i do not; and none of my brethren, that i know of, do. the
catholic believes the pope … to be as liable to error, as almost any other man
in the universe. man is man, and no man is infallible, either in doctrine or
morals.”

contraception

in 1968 pope paul vi banned contraception other than abstinence and the rhythm
method. since that time the world has expanded to seven billion people.

early priestly marriage

from http://www.futurechurch.org/fpm/history.htm
/> “a brief history of celibacy in the
catholic church

first century
peter, the first pope, and the apostles that jesus chose were, for the most
part, married men. the new testament implies that women presided at eucharistic
meals in the early church.

second and third century
age of gnosticism: light and spirit are good, darkness and material things are
evil. a person cannot be married and be perfect. however, most priests were
married.

fourth century
306-council of elvira, spain, decree #43: a priest who sleeps with his wife the
night before mass will lose his job.
325-council of nicea: decreed that after ordination a priest could not marry.
proclaimed the nicene creed.
352-council of laodicea: women are not to be ordained. this suggests that before
this time there was ordination of women.
385-pope siricius left his wife in order to become pope. decreed that priests
may no longer sleep with their wives.”

women priests

352 ad 352-council of laodicea: decress that women must not be ordained,
implying that before this council there was ordination of women.

other sites:
http://thenazareneway.com/heresies%20ebionites,%20elkasites,%20nazarenes.htm
http://www.all-creatures.org/cva/default.htm
/>
http://www.cvauk.org/
/>
http://catholicveg.blogspot.com
http://spot.acorn.net/fruitarian
/>

revised may 21, 2013

St Blaize born 316 AD healed wild animals.
The emperor’s hunters found him surrounded by his
wild animal friends when they came to seize animals
for the barbarisms of the colisseum. Because Blaize
would not allow this, he was arrested.  On his
journey in captivity, a woman whose pig was carried
off by a wolf was very distressed. Blaize caused
the wolf to drop the pig.  Many miracles to humans
and animals are attributed to him.

Jesuit missionaries in India adopted a vegetarian diet
Source: Feb 4 Butler’s Lives of the Saints, edited by Thurston

Rabanus Maurus of Mainz, (780-856), according to Butler’s
Lives of the Saints as edited by Thurston, ate no meat and
drank no wine. There are hundreds of vegetarian saints
listed in Butler, including the fruitarian Paul the Hermit.

The book Vegetarian Christian Saints by Holly Roberts
lists many more.